The Art Apocalypse: Is It Real?

I’m unsure if this counts as a fun fact or not but, I’ve never read Hunger Games. I feel like it’s considered a rite of passage of sorts? Like it’s assumed every bookworm/avid reader discovered their love for books with Harry Potter and continued this journey with young adult dystopian/post-apocalyptic novels and less dark but equally detailed fantasy franchises. Honestly, no judgement. Hunger Games sounds great, I just can’t commit to completing series that are longer than two books! I’m either obsessed with an author or will read one of their works and never touch another. I’m pretty sure I started the first Hunger Games and left it halfway. At the time, dystopia as a genre just didn’t seem appealing. I didn’t get the fuss surrounding these alternate worlds with seemingly warped rules and for the most part, normal characters.

Fiction for me meant escapism. Positive outcomes, power-driven characters and of course, the fight and struggle, just not too much of it. Although I still love the “riding into the sunset” endings, I’ve grown to appreciate dystopian art. I get the fuss, they’re a very clever way of artists using their work to showcase reality through fabrication. Dystopia as a genre has so much to offer us, but think about it; art as a whole gets the gears of your brain turning. One looks to literature and film because it’s a show of people like us having experiences and lives that are well, the stuff of movies. Yet, it pushes you to think that you can achieve that ideal too. An underlying motive of dystopian art is just that. It speaks to that “light at the end of the tunnel” craving part of you. The message dystopian narratives relay is that; even if the world as you know it changes, and its order turns upside down, you have a mind. An opinion, the power to think and endure which you must keep alive. You can push back and who knows? Find the Peeta to your Katniss. (I’M SORRY) I have nothing against the Hunger Games couple, it’s just hilarious the way there’s always a strong romance maintained despite the world ending.

On a more serious note, dystopian classics like 1984, Animal Farm, The Handmaid’s Tale, Fahrenheit 451 etc. present a more stark reality. We see how this genre has its levels. While dystopian literature’s young adult counterparts follow semi-hopeful, feminist storylines with the protagonists leading and emerging victorious in combat against an oppressive government, Orwell and Atwood’s protagonists are already in too deep. They’ve succumbed to an extremist structure larger than them and far too powerful to fight against. In this sense, dystopian art is a cautionary tale. A guide and a warning. Strongest at times when humanity begins to suspect the error of its ways.

The popularity of the dystopian genre speaks volumes of our psychodrama because when activists declare the need for change and the impending disasters awaiting us, many look the other way. Mainly because we’re terrified of the truth, it’s too daunting. But, through dystopian art; by creating these extreme worlds of ink, these precarious other universes, artists simply pose the question, ‘What if?’ And it’s much easier to stomach through the lens of what if. The artist isn’t directly telling you of their fears for our future. Giving new names to the problems we face, dystopias indirectly make us realise that this “other” world isn’t far from ours. This surveillance, torture, war, hampering of progress and oppression, can you see it happening? The question arises, can we fight back as well?

A picture that reminded me of just how wild the range of dystopian art is

The term ‘art-pocalypse’ was coined in the 2000s to account for the rise in the publishing and subsequent popularity of dystopian fiction, tv shows, films and art. I feel like there was and is so much that contributes to the mindsets in which these works were created and consumed. The very fact that we have our world to compare another’s worst period to adds to the thrill of being an accomplice to a dystopia. Not to mention, the relief that comes with realising that we aren’t subject to these atrocities yet and the chill running down your spine when a part of you wonders, ‘or are we?’. It’s also foolish to think that the creators of dystopian art are conniving psychopaths. They live to tell the tale and dystopian art through the years can be seen as a timeline of the greatest terrors of humanity. We can see this from the way different depictions tackle concepts ranging from dictators to media control to climate change.

Something to remember is that dystopias are nothing to be afraid of. Avoiding them because they’re too dark or twisted means you’re missing out! They’re immersive and a way of championing real-life issues on the part of their creators. Pondering upon the way dystopian fiction brings out this rebellious, defiant, ready-to-fight aspect in people who watch or read it or how often the world seems to be eerily similar, always brings me to the life imitates art v/s art imitates life debate. The way dystopian art makes us want to be unruly, to protest, to surmount complex structures reveals so much about the way words and pictures put us in a sort of permanent mindset. Art has such power. The art we choose to consume builds our personality. I might be exaggerating, but art in its purest form and even in its messiest, leaves us changed in some way. For better or for worse? That’s not for this post to decide.

There’s a Million Musicals I haven’t watched… But just You Wait

First of all, props to me for being spontaneous! I had a post on another topic in the works but this felt more like my vibe today. (Don’t worry the other one’s coming soon too) So, unlike most fans of musicals, I didn’t like them at first. I felt like most musical aficionados (though I still wouldn’t call myself one) were the ones performing renditions of classic songs since they could form sentences, because that’s the very image people have in their minds- a group of Broadway crazy theatre kids or weirdly talented high schoolers. (Glee; even though you’re an amazing show, this is your fault) But that’s not true, a musical theatre fan can be someone who didn’t fully comprehend them until she watched Sound of Music in the fifth grade (I know). Soon after, I discovered more movie musicals like Mamma Mia and West Side Story, and I wasn’t as compelled by them as I am now but I knew musicals were something I enjoyed watching.

Before we move on– On 28th September, A Writ Much completed one year of being on WordPress! I love writing on here so much and interacting with my readers. Thanks everyone who’s supported and followed my blog this past year!

Coming back to musicals, let me tell you about the day I like to call my ‘enlightenment’. To my great dismay, I am not a thespian and even though I’d like to be Idina Menzel I’m her raspy alter ego. For this reason, I stuck to lip-synching while seeing musicals. that was of course before I discovered… Hamilton (I’m hearing a round of applause and cheering in my mind right now, even as I write this). I used to wish my love for musicals hadn’t started with a musical as renowned and popular as Hamilton. You know, it could have been an underappreciated but artistic and perceptive musical like The Light in the Piazza (look it up and watch it immediately). But then I realised, what could be more profound, distinctive and confounding than Hamilton?! Ironically, I don’t remember the exact month but it was the day after it came out that one of my best friends suggested we watch it. And my god were we left in awe. After this, I watched it two more times and soon, I was watching all the interviews, belting Satisfied and You’ll Be Back, reading about the hidden messages and loopholes, the history behind the lyrics and characters. The rest is… well history!

An accurate depiction of what my mind looked like after Hamilton

The reason why Hamilton is sort of a milestone and a musical I will always remember vividly is because I was so exceptionally bored then, at the beginning of the pandemic that it was an experience! Reading the endless Hamilton sources on the web and having the epiphany that musicals are more than a bunch of people singing. Broadway isn’t a piece of cake because writing music, a story through music and carefully crafted lyrics is as consuming and challenging as writing a book or a play or a movie. Hamilton was the beginning of this fascinating journey through a field I’d never taken seriously before and I haven’t invested myself in a musical as much after that because well, the sad fact is that I don’t have time to spare peeping behind the curtains (see what I did there) anymore. But, I do watch new musicals whenever I can and read a good amount about them.

I couldn’t stop at Hamilton of course so, I’ve come up with a plan all to discover the magical world of musicals. I started with movie musicals as they were just easier to access. After some quick research, I had a watchlist ready in my notes app, quite a bit behind on that right now but as soon as I can sit and devote two hours (three, let’s not forget rewinding so I can listen to ingenious lyrics) to a musical, I will be unstoppable. I began with basics like In The Heights (2021), then Hairspray (2007), Les Misérables (2012), Rent (2005) and the list continues in chronological order.

But, I couldn’t forget stage musicals that are a whole new world. I’m having a much harder time sourcing them so thus far, I’ve only seen two- one being Dear Evan Hansen just last month. The latest musical I watched was Everybody’s Talking About Jamie (2021) which is wildly underrated, why is the internet not as excited about it as they are about Cinderella??! I guess I’d just like to end this post by saying that, you might consider musicals boring and stupid but there’s a reason people keep making them. Musicals amplify any emotion you feel and when you’re in the grip of that emotion, hearing that song is a freeing feeling. No matter who you are, musicals make you the main character. So, the next time someone can’t stop talking about their love for musicals, don’t rain on their parade. Once you discover the tip of the iceberg we call musical theatre, you can’t stop singing about it.

Dwell in Possibilities

Last blog post of the year! Usually, at the end of a year I recount the things I’m thankful for, so this time I want to emphasize one of the things that got me through this nightmare of a year- nostalgia. When I think of nostalgia, buzzwords like memories and dreams come to mind. I once read that being nostalgic means you’re stuck in the past. I’ve even read that nostalgia is a form of day-dreaming! However, this year, I’ve realized that it is anything but. I realized what being nostalgic truly feels like. As the world came crashing down, nostalgia was my getaway. Thinking of good times from 2019 or earlier became a coping mechanism.

To some, nostalgia is a picture, a memory, a book. To me, music is what unlocks nostalgia, is what unlocks that overflow of bitter-sweet memories that you can’t help but smile at. This year, I think we all needed an escape sometimes and that’s okay. Recounting memories isn’t living in the past, but is cherishing it. When I’m nostalgic, I find myself thinking how fast something went by and it makes me all the more intent on enjoying the present. Nostalgia also has more of a motivating factor for me. It gives me that rush of adrenaline I need to finish that last bit of work or read that last chapter as my eyes get heavy. Sometimes you need that boost from the past to enjoy the present.

This post doesn’t really have a lesson, rather I want to bring to light an underrated emotion. Think about it, in every book or movie, when nothing seems to work out for the main character or they lost the love of their life or their idea didn’t go as planned- what helps? They flashback to a better time in their lives and they are inspired to continue, to start anew. Then follows the happy ending.

Nostalgia also gave me hope. Hope that things will get better, hope that the next day won’t be as bad. Hope is always followed by something good. If anything, 2020 was a year filled with hope. Even if it wasn’t all sunshine and rainbows, we had our good moments. I certainly did, and nostalgia got me there. Even now, as the year ends and we say ‘I hope 2021 is better’ that’s hope. That’s the light at the end of the tunnel. Whatever came our way, we never stopped hoping. For me, a part of that hope came from nostalgia. From the bitter aspect of it, which reminded me of all my blue days, and how they didn’t last.

So, thanks nostalgia. You can keep collecting my memories and letting them out when someone asks me ‘What’s a memory that you cherish?’ or ‘What’s a time you’d wish to relive?’ and then, follows the sudden rush of joy and a dash of longing I like to call nostalgia.

As 2020 ends, there are some moments I’d like to remember but overall, I think this year will be a reminder to me, that disaster struck but we went on, times changed but we slowly adapted, and that no matter what happens you have to keep going.

PS.- Of all things, I’ll remember this as the year I started this blog:)

Happy New Year!

Is History Trying to Tell Us Something?

In two of the last books I read, Pachinko and The Bastard of Istanbul I saw a common theme; that our past lives within the present, and history often repeats itself, when we don’t know it. Now, these thoughts are much too overwhelming to analyze. I don’t know about you, but knowing that certain instances I’ve seen are just the past recurring? To me, that sounds like the plot of a fantasy novel, where the world is stuck in some sort of punishment. Considering the human race is one that thrives on the idea of ‘different’, I am shocked that we even let history repeat itself!

What’s common between the people that history, that the world idolizes? What makes them inspiring? It’s the fact that they all thought unique. They innovated and brought unconventional ideas to the table. When someone doesn’t stick to the ‘status quo’, that’s the start of every great movement, the beginning of every revolution. No-one wants to be ordinary! We’re ordered to think differently. Yet, every revolutionaries’ story begins with society condemning them… But that’s a debate for another time.

I’m not saying different is bad, uniqueness makes the world better. But I’m surprised that history can still repeat itself when all each generation wants to do is make their mark, ensure that their new ideas are recorded in history books.

source: https://pin.it/3WrAgwK

Above is one of the many common quotes you read about time. We’ve all heard or read that phrase: history repeats itself when we choose to ignore it- or a variation of it. I completely agree. We see it happening even now- with the same tragedies, discrimination, and issues faced by us decades ago, still prevalent. Every day, I see yet another disturbing act of violence making the headlines, another case of injustice taking place, and think: why? Why aren’t we learning from history?

So, as I pen this blog post I realize that yes, history does repeat itself when we ignore the past when we rule it out because we often feel that the world has evolved. But, that posed yet another puzzling question in my head. As the world fights the COVID 19 pandemic, analyses have come to show that a full-scale pandemic seems to occur every 100 years. Examples of this are the Plague in 1720, Cholera in 1820, and the Spanish flu in 1918. Finally, right on time, we are currently in a pandemic in 2020.

We also see striking similarities between these pandemics whether in their effects or how they are conducted. Now, here’s where I am confused. If this is another act of history-repetition, what exactly are we to learn from it? If the past indeed repeats itself because we ignore it- what about the Plague or even the Coronavirus are we disregarding? This is truly something I want to understand so if you have a theory do tell me about it!

OTHER BLOG POSTS ON THE TOPIC:

Why Does History Repeat Itself?

Infinite Loop

Does History Repeat Itself When We Refuse To Acknowledge It?

Review: Pachinko by Min Jin Lee

This book is a great work of fiction, spanning over nearly 100 years and two countries. It begins in Korea, 1911 and by the end, we’ve reached Japan, 1989. But the author has blended the storylines very well and seamlessly taken the story along, so the change in characters and periods doesn’t seem abrupt at all. Since the book ranges across four generations of characters, it highlights how one’s history plays a huge role in a person’s life and how, as the phrase goes- has a tendency to repeat itself. It shows how a defining moment of one’s life continues to define and affect the actions of generations down the line.

The plot is centered around one Sunja, a woman born in a small town in Korea. It begins with her father, whose memory and wise words are remembered by her till the end of the book. Her grandparents ran a lodging house, which is passed down to her parents, whose story we are told too. That’s another thing I liked about the book- everyone’s story and point of view is told. In any situation, we read about what each person involved is thinking at that moment, even if it’s just a few lines. Anyway, Sunja spends the first sixteen years of her life at the lodging house until she marries a kind pastor, staying there, and goes with him to Japan.

The story then moves to the city of Osaka in Japan where Sunja stays with her brother and sister-in-law and her husband. We are then introduced to another dynamic and focus of the book which is the treatment of Korean immigrants in pre-WW2 Japan. I didn’t know this tension between the two regions existed and it was a saddening insight into what so many families must have faced.

We see how Sunja’s new family who were rich in Korea are made to live in a ghetto and work odd jobs in order to survive. Not only them, but she tells us about all the Koreans she knew in Japan who were reduced from riches to rags and who struggled to make ends meet. Every character faces some form of prosecution and discrimination at some point. But despite all they were facing, the family made the best of what they had and found a way to be happy.

At certain points in the book, it seemed like their situation was impossible and there was no way out, but somehow they survived, rising like a phoenix from the ashes. Of all things, the characters’ resilience and survival instinct was in my opinion, portrayed very well throughout the book. It was shown in various contexts and not only inspiring but well-thought-out as well.

The book ends on a sad note for most characters, but there is a ray of hope and an assurance given to us, letting us subtly know that the characters will be alright. As always, I loved reading about a new culture, a new history. Pachinko also passes the Bechdel test

Final thoughts- I didn’t realize the relation between the name of the book and the story until the last few chapters. Pachinko is a Japanese pinball game and a gambling business of sorts. Both of Sunja’s sons were involved in the pachinko business and it eventually becomes the family business. Many relations are made between the game of pachinko and the game of life in the book. So, I felt the name was a smart pick because, in a way, pachinko represents the life of Koreans in Japan and life in general as well!

Which other books with similar themes to Pachinko have you read?

Living every day in the presence of those who refuse to acknowledge your humanity takes great courage.

~ Min Jin Lee, Pachinko.

OTHER REVIEWS OF THE BOOK:

Pachinko by Min Jin Lee: A Great Epic

PACHINKO- A REVIEW

Pachinko by Min Jin Lee

The Bechdel Test: A Call for Representation

No study of female representation in media is complete without the Bechdel Test. Advocacy for diversity in every field is increasing, as it should. Yet, few understand the need for it in movies. Everybody loves movies, they tell stories that leave us crying, laughing, and always longing for more. They’re a different kind of comfort food. There’s a movie about anything you could name. But, we see a pattern in most of them. A code of conduct that a majority of filmmakers follow.

The Bechdel Test created by Allison Bechdel in 1985 is a test of the representation of women in fiction. Although it can be used to analyze books as well, its original focus was cinema when it was introduced in the form of a comic strip by Bechdel who credited the idea to her friend Liz Wallace and the writings of Virginia Woolf. There are three criteria a work of fiction must include to pass the Bechdel Test:

Do you see how little the test asks for? Note the words ‘at least two named women’ and ‘anything besides a man’. On first reading this, I thought; How hard could it be? We’re in the 21st century! I’m sure 80% of the movies I’ve seen easily pass it. You will be surprised at the number of movies you consider ‘hits’ and ‘blockbusters’ which barely pass the test.

Take a look at the numbers- a report shows that just 33.1 percent of speaking roles in 2018’s top-grossing films. We see an improvement in the 2019 numbers where 45 to 54.9 percent of all speaking roles were women. So, we have two or more women who talk to each other- you’re almost there just one more step and your movie has passed the test. But here’s where most films fail. According to the criteria, these women must have at least one conversation (this conversation only has to happen once for a film to pass) about something, anything besides a man. It leaves so much to the imagination!

A BBC Analysis of the Oscars revealed that fewer than half of the 89 films named best picture passed the test. Why is this the case? Why are filmmakers still struggling to fulfill the most minimal criteria? Besides, if the largest and most influential film industry in the world can’t implement the Bechdel Test in its award-winning movies, how should we expect the rest of the world to follow?

I think the most common misconception people have of the Bechdel Test is that it asks for ‘feminist’ and women-centric movies. But the plot of a movie does not have to revolve around the conversation of its characters. A movie needs to have some reality to it, so why doesn’t the scene cut to the female supporting characters talking about the news, or their favorite show, or even the game last night? Instead of how cute that guy is, should I text him? Women have other things to talk about too, you know.

When it comes to having two named female characters, I think a well-rounded personality is all we’re asking for. Someone who isn’t just defined by that one line they said or the plot of the movie.

Now I’m not saying all films should have the same characters, the same storyline. But a little representation wouldn’t hurt. Diversity makes this world stronger, it’s the sundae and the rest is the cherry on top. There are some great movies out there made by some talented people, but their uniqueness gives them that wow-factor. Although its criteria seem quite normal, the Bechdel Test asks for something different in today’s film industry. I think it’s time we see that change!

Which of the movies you’ve seen pass the Bechdel Test?

P. S- If you’d like the names of some movies which pass the test I’ve included a link under sources.

This is a line from the ‘Carry On’ series by Rainbow Rowell. It’s one of my favorite series and the first place I read about the Test!

SOURCES:

2019 Statistics| Women and Hollywood

2019’s Bechdel Passing Films

What is the Bechdel Test and why are movies still not passing it?

It’s time to move beyond the Bechdel Test

OTHER BLOG POSTS ON THE TOPIC:

The Bechdel Test: Is It Still Relevant Today?

Movies I Like That Pass The Bechdel Test

Review: Girl, Woman, Other by Bernadine Evaristo

I’m open to reading all genres but by far, my favorites are historical and cultural fiction. These past months I’ve been trying to read and learn about black culture, history and educate myself in any way I can. So far, I’ve always found a book for anything I need to know and that’s first source I turned to. While diversity and representation still struggles to thrive in films, it has been prevalent in literature for years!

Now, I’m not saying that this one book taught me all I need to know. But it certainly taught me something new in every chapter. Girl, Woman, Other spotlights the stories of twelve, black and British characters across the age, gender and class spectrum. It won the Booker Prize in 2019 and I’m not surprised, this book totally deserved it. It’s witty, engaging and impossible to put down.

The book is divided into five chapters and an epilogue. Each chapter revolves around the stories of three characters, who are all connected personally. They are all primarily black, female and some are a part of the LGBTQ+ community. Apart from their experiences we see how their race, shapes their personality in a large way. The book begins with Amma, a lesbian playwright whose currently fifty years old and nervous for the premiere of her newest play. She looks back on when she first came to London in 1980, a fierce feminist ready to oppose anyone who puts her down. She meets Dominique, whose story is told later in the chapter and the both of them start a theater company with the aim of telling black and Asian women’s stories. If I told you the rest, I’d be spoiling it but Amma’s play is the basis of the book. The characters of the other chapters are all connected to her play in some way- from its watchers to its critics.

Another thing I’d like to highlight is the poetic telling of the book. The punctuation is unique and confusing at times but it’s what keeps the story going. I noticed that the characters in each chapter are so similar yet different. For instance, as the first chapter goes on we read about Amma’s daughter, Yazz who is nineteen years old and quite like the young version of Amma we read about earlier. The three women of the chapter are strikingly similar in terms of the what they stood for, what they’ve gone through. Each of them were disliked for being outspoken. Yet, Yazz never connected with her mother. Even though, both women stood for the same cause, they were never on the same page.

I observed this pattern across the book where characters in such relationships went through the same. I think it simply shows how we as human beings often struggle to communicate or find common ground with one another and looks for our differences rather than or similarities. It goes on to tell us of Carole, a successful banker who went to Oxford. She rejects her Nigerian roots and her background having had a traumatic experience, leaving her mother, Bummi disappointed. Then there’s Shirley who wishes to be more while her mother, Winsome wishes her daughter would stop whining. There’s also Penelope, the main focus of the epilogue. She’s adopted and brought up in a white family but not knowing her true heritage bothers her.

This book is inclusive on so many levels. One of the first things that compelled me to read the book was the acknowledgements. (I’ve attached a picture at the end) Something which I feel should be normalized and seen more often is stories like the last chapter- about a non-binary person called Megan/Morgan. A certain part of the chapter is written under the pronouns ‘they/them’ and it was great.

I also realized how we have managed to categorize an entire community by one word. Take ‘black’. It stands for a community of Nigerians, Somalis, African Americans, British Americans, Ethiopians and that doesn’t begin to cover all the people of different faiths and ethnicities.

Final thoughts~ I highly recommend this book if you wish to learn about black history and culture or if you’re interested in books which raise timeless questions about feminism and race.

The compelling acknowledgements

Living through History while Postponing Revolution

#blogging #pandemic

We’re in October. When did that happen? Only two months and this nightmare of a year will be over. But even though we’ve all been saying things like ‘I can’t WAIT for this year to be over!!!’ what are we hoping for? Do you think the minute the clock strikes 12 on the 31st of December, that COVID-19 will just vanish into thin air? Or will vaccines fall from the sky into our hands? The year does not have anything to do with the unfortunate events that are going on in the world. Racism, bad presidents, wildfires and violence against women are all things which were always prevalent and will continue to remain prevalent in 2021. Only the dates of their happenings will change. But amongst everything that has happened in the past 9 months, of all the changes that this pandemic has brought about, something that I find really hard to believe- something I still can’t fully wrap my head around is the fact that what I’m currently going through, what we as a world are going through is living history. This pandemic is a global crisis, a major milestone on the timeline of the human race. It’s something that students decades later will probably study. Coronavirus and the toll it’s taken on the world, what it’s putting the human race through is something that history books will record, that generations like me will look back on. Stories will be written about it and generations to come will talk about it and wonder, what we went through during this time. It’s the same way we talk about the plague or the Spanish flu. There are entire books and movies based on past pandemics. We find those black-and-white or brown pictures; of people with masks on the infected lying on hammock-type beds. I can imagine it: as students of the future are given the list of history’s worst pandemics, the coronavirus pandemic will be at the very bottom. I’m hoping it will in fact be at the bottom and no other successes it.

This is from an article I read which was the inspiration for this post. If you’d like to read it, I’ve attached the link at the end!

However, back to the present, did we all forget that 2020 was supposed to be THE year. The start of a new decade, plans for a better world were made. Visionaries had set out to change the world in 2020! Our leaders had promised us, ‘By 2022, India/USA/China/Saudi Arabia/ literally any other country will be at the top of the world!’ they said. Right now, with the economy crashing I do not see that happening any time soon. For me in quarantine, every day is pretty much the same. I wake up, attend classes for school if I have any and then spend the rest of the day just laying around. But every night, before I sleep I plan the tasks I want to accomplish the next day.  Say, complete the three projects I have from school or do something productive instead of just watching television or being on my phone and of course, I always find myself in the same, unaccomplished position. But so far, writing regularly is the only thing I’ve managed to keep up. The work I plan to do each day almost never gets done and I feel guilty every single day for being a procrastinator. But, in times like these when every day things just seem to get worse and even walking out my front door seems impossible…. I feel unmotivated. And I think that’s okay. This generation of the human race has NEVER seen anything like this before. So, trying to push yourself to actually get something done when anxiety is taking over your brain because the world feels like it’s coming to an end is hard. I’m sure everyone has had what I call the ‘2020 panic attack’ before. All I’m telling myself right now is that it’s okay to do nothing because we all need a break, sometimes. Things feel out of place and getting back to normal is currently every person’s fantasy. So, one day I WILL tick off each task on my to-do list: 

1. Complete schoolwork

2. Get out of bed before 12

3. Learn 2 languages

4. Write a book

5. Sketch a scenery 

6. Cure cancer

7. Become a revolutionary and change the world

You know, the usual things we all do to pass time! Jokes aside, if you’re having a bad day and it happens to the best of us, just relax. What is the most relaxing activity you can think of? Do that. I’ve been having one of those weeks and I call such days/weeks a mental health break. Maybe tomorrow I will wake up and feel motivated and energetic enough to do stuff, to have a productive quarantine. That day is just not today. 

This is from an article by the New York Times which really lifted my spirits about not being productive. The link has been attached!

ARTICLES WORTH THE READ:

The New York Times Article

We Are In The Midst Of Making History

Hi there!

#zerotohero #blogging

Welcome to my blog, A Writ Much! As I write this post I’m still struggling to figure out the many process of starting a blog on WordPress. It really isn’t easy huh? The minute I filled in the name, a million other requirements and emails just came flooding in! The next morning I had almost 25 emails regarding my website in my inbox. Before I move on, this post is simply an introductory one. I figured I’d let readers into the mind behind this screen, these words. If you’ll go to my home page, you’ll see I have a slogan; my words speak louder than my actions. That statement could not be truer because I am indeed the most awkward human being you will ever meet! I would rather jump off a cliff than attend a gathering with a bunch of people I don’t know. I feel like every time I speak a bunch of sounds come out of my mouth. My social awkwardness and reserved demeanor often leads people to believe the misconception that I have no opinions whatsoever. But the truth is, that I have a lot to say! So, here I am typing these words hoping you’ll read them, hoping you’d like to read what I have to say.

I’ve never been the diary-type of girl as I find the idea of jotting down every event of my boring life utterly useless. Instead I maintain a journal which I only write in when I need somewhere to vent. But I thought to myself, it’s time my writings had an outlet and a blog felt like the best way to connect with others who might think or feel the same way I do!

That brings me to the next thing, I already have a bunch of topics in mind and I can’t wait to get started on them. I don’t want to give too much away but my posts will be ranging across multiple topics like book reviews, opinions on current affairs on societal stigmas and opinionated posts. Mental health is something really important to me and certain issues like activism, equality and writing which are really close to my heart will be featured daily.

I really just want to be recognized, to connect with others and know that I’m not alone on certain things because sometimes that’s something that helps, knowing I’m not alone. I hope that you, as a reader will relate to my content too and come back for more because that’s really all I want.

I’m just someone who wants to be heard and I hope you will help out:)

Anyway, signing off now, I can’t wait to get writing!

P.S: The slogan and name of my blog, both have a little play on words.

Let me know in the comments what you think they’ve been adapted from!